waywardgoosefarmstudio:

3 color reduction linoleum print, “spotted salamander”.  We found the model on the floor in the barn early this spring one morning when we arrived for milking. 

waywardgoosefarmstudio:

3 color reduction linoleum print, “spotted salamander”.  We found the model on the floor in the barn early this spring one morning when we arrived for milking. 

(via waywardgoosefarmstudio)

This morning’s brief but intense thunderstorm and its accompanying downpour did nothing to quench the heat. In fact, there’s a moist haziness parked over us. These ladies have the right idea: find a nice tree and relax in its shade. That’s all you can do.

This morning’s brief but intense thunderstorm and its accompanying downpour did nothing to quench the heat. In fact, there’s a moist haziness parked over us. These ladies have the right idea: find a nice tree and relax in its shade. That’s all you can do.

Turns out, Cedar, who in yesterday’s post was the ringleader to a bunch of truant cows, indeed had been plotting fresh mischief for the day ahead. When, at 5:15 this morning, she didn’t come in with the rest of the herd, Dan and I made our way to the far corners of the pasture to investigate, pretty sure of what we’d find.

The Consider Bardwell kids, in their adjoining pasture, stared sleepily in the doorway of their fancy chateau as we trudged closer for a look.

As we suspected, a new bull calf, his belly full, lay hidden in the grass beside his troublesome mama.

Cedar, of course, refused to budge without her calf, and the calf, of course, was too full to do much of anything. As always with a case like this, Dan hefted him up to carry him as far as his sore bones would allow which, as it usually does, set off the little bloke’s blatting mechanism, turned up extra loud! This signaled to Jackee, the resident baby napper already half way to the gate, that she must SAVE THAT BABY!! You can see the tiny Jackee dot in the distance at a full run, coming to save the day!

After making sure that baby was being adequately cared for, she allowed the procession to continue, bringing up the rear as the little chap continued to bellow.

By the time Dan reached the gate, the whole gang had turned back to investigate like a bunch of nosy old biddies, jostling and bumping into Dan and his load, making a strength sapping experience even more difficult.

The cows finally allowing him safe passage, he ended up having to carry his burden most of the way to the barn. I did meet him with a wheelbarrow at the end, in which he deposited the full bellied little guy but thankfully no one was available to get a photo of THAT.

All the cows but 8 made their way to the barn this morning after Dan had crossed them from the Consider Bardwell pasture into ours. It was my job, at 6:33, to track down the gang of truants while Dan got started milking the rest of the herd who’d gone straight to the barn with no dilly dallying. Somehow I knew Cedar, due to freshen soon and newly returned from the dry cow pasture a few miles away, would be involved. 

As soon as I spied the hoodlums I knew I was right. That big, bossy lady stood lookout while the rest took their time grazing among the bee balm.

After a multitude of threats and insults, they grudgingly took their time and meandered off toward the barn. Dilly dallying takes effort though and parched from all the slacking off, they had to stop and quench their thirst at the water tub like a gang of sweaty school kids dawdling around a drinking fountain.

Milking finished with a new day and a fresh chunk of pasture ahead of them, they all made their way back over the hill to see what other mischief Cedar can plan for them.

Each day here ends with a sunset more breathtaking than the previous one! We don’t get any days off but we don’t spend much time lamenting it when we have such incredible scenery surrounding us.

Each day here ends with a sunset more breathtaking than the previous one! We don’t get any days off but we don’t spend much time lamenting it when we have such incredible scenery surrounding us.

My latest project, a linoleum print that I could use for printing T shirts. We wanted to be able to offer Wayward Goose Farm T shirts in the new farm store and printing our own seemed like a good idea, especially after I finally found block printing ink specifically for use on fabric. Then I found a source for bulk T shirts at a reasonable price so of course I ordered 55.  Not having a press, however, made the actual printing a bit of a challenge.  A piece of ply wood placed carefully atop the inked plate, which had been carefully placed atop the laid out shirt, and then a good old stomping proved to be a very effective printing method. My knees were complaining after the first 40 shirts so Dan offered to finish up the rest this morning. Now our house is decorated with drying shirts hanging over every surface from which they can be draped. 

Mylar, doing what she’s supposed to.

Mylar, doing what she’s supposed to.

Makin’ hay.

theoutdorables:

This is the view from a little hill in the pasture behind Sugar House Creamery, which is also the only place with cell reception. It’s okay looking I guess. During my time here so far I have gotten bruised, tanned, scraped, splattered with poop, covered in whey and doused in the water of the Ausable. But besides dunking myself in various liquids I have been learning a lot- even though I’ve lived on a farm my whole life, this is the first time I’ve ever seriously worked on one. Now I certainly have a new appreciation for the passion with which my family pursues this trade. I’ve never been more tired! Working without stop for what amounts to nearly 24/7 (animals never stop needing humans) and never getting a day off is not something most would choose, but I come from a family of unapologetic farmers who love that label and work like the dickens. I feel proud.

Thoughts from our girl Jill, in the Adirondacks for the summer with her big sis Margot, learning the ways (wheys?) of cheese making!  We feel proud!!

theoutdorables:

This is the view from a little hill in the pasture behind Sugar House Creamery, which is also the only place with cell reception. It’s okay looking I guess. During my time here so far I have gotten bruised, tanned, scraped, splattered with poop, covered in whey and doused in the water of the Ausable. But besides dunking myself in various liquids I have been learning a lot- even though I’ve lived on a farm my whole life, this is the first time I’ve ever seriously worked on one. Now I certainly have a new appreciation for the passion with which my family pursues this trade. I’ve never been more tired! Working without stop for what amounts to nearly 24/7 (animals never stop needing humans) and never getting a day off is not something most would choose, but I come from a family of unapologetic farmers who love that label and work like the dickens. I feel proud.

Thoughts from our girl Jill, in the Adirondacks for the summer with her big sis Margot, learning the ways (wheys?) of cheese making!  We feel proud!!

Rhubarb from our garden, eggs from our chickens, cream from our cows: it’s rhubarb custard pie this week in the farm store fridge!

Rhubarb from our garden, eggs from our chickens, cream from our cows: it’s rhubarb custard pie this week in the farm store fridge!